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summ facks

May 06, 2018 04:23AM
Quote
sstrams
Cuz it would kin do make me wonder how the Jaws guys would know about it, then.. Hopefully somebody chimes in on that one..


Note: everything in this post after this note is copied from net sources, none of it is me writing stuff.


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USS Indianapolis (CA-35) was a heavy cruiser commissioned in 1932, active throughout World War II, it was torpedoed and sunk by Imperial Japanese Navy submarine I-58 in July 1945. With a total crew of 1,197 only 317 survived. It is the worst maritime disaster in the history of the United States Navy.

...

In the first official statement, the Navy said that distress calls "were keyed by radio operators and possibly were actually transmitted" but that "no evidence has been developed that any distress message from the ship was received by any ship, aircraft or shore station". Declassified records later showed that three stations received the signals but none acted upon the call. One commander was drunk, another had ordered his men not to disturb him and a third thought it was a Japanese trap.

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While many of Indianapolis's survivors said McVay was not to blame for the sinking, the families of some of the men who died thought otherwise: "Merry Christmas! Our family's holiday would be a lot merrier if you hadn't killed my son", read one piece of mail. The guilt that was placed on his shoulders mounted until he committed suicide in 1968, using his Navy-issued revolver. McVay was discovered on his front lawn by his gardener with a toy sailor in one hand, revolver in the other. He was 70 years old.

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New details: Sharks, secrets and the sinking of the USS Indianapolis


[www.cnn.com]


In 2015, the director of the Naval History and Heritage Command told an Indianapolis reunion: "There is no question that the loss of USS Indianapolis is one of the blackest episodes in the history of the U.S. Navy. But I also believe that even in loss and tragedy, there are examples of extraordinary valor and sacrifice that deserve to be remembered, that serve as an inspiration to sailors today and in the future, and there are lessons learned that must be preserved and passed on, and are relevant even now. The Indianapolis story has these in abundance."

When the 1975 blockbuster "Jaws" first terrified moviegoers, not all of the fear came from the special effects or haunting soundtrack. One of the more chilling scenes was fisherman Quint's quiet recounting of bobbing in Pacific waters for days while sharks circled him and his fellow sailors, waiting to see who would be the next victim. Quint described the sharks' black, lifeless eyes, the blood-curdling screams, the ocean turning red.

That grim story, painted from the real-life sinking of the USS Indianapolis near the end of World War II, is part of an upcoming Nicolas Cage movie and a Navy Web page produced ahead of Saturday's 71st anniversary of the tragedy.
The unescorted Indianapolis carried almost 1,200 sailors and had just delivered to Tinian Island components of the atomic bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan. Its secret mission over, the cruiser departed Guam and steamed for Leyte, an island in the Philippines, for training.
But torpedoes from a Japanese submarine sent the ship, and up to 300 of its men, to the bottom of the ocean in just 12 minutes in the first hour of July 30, 1945. The frantic crew was unable to get off a successful distress signal.
Of an estimated 800 sailors who went into the water, only 316 survived the nearly five-day ordeal -- the rest succumbing to burns, dehydration, exhaustion, shark attacks and drowning.

While some Americans are familiar with the demise of the Indianapolis -- the highest loss of Navy personnel at sea -- a recent nugget of information sheds new light on where the ship was attacked.
Here are six questions about the USS Indianapolis and lessons learned:

What's the new clue on where the ship went down?

Richard Hulver, a historian for the Naval History and Heritage Command, knew that an LST -- an acronym for a cargo and troop carrier -- came across the USS Indianapolis 11 to 12 hours before the sinking.
Wanting to know more about the location of the encounter, Hulver did a Google search on "USS Indianapolis" and "LST."
Bingo.
In May 2015, the son of a U.S. sailor who was on the LST wrote a blog post on the website of a fudge shop his family operates in Mackinaw City, Michigan. While the post did not give the number of the LST, Hulver found through records that Seaman 1st Class Francis G. Murdick was catching a ride on LST-779.
USS Indianapolis: Research, photos, documents and more
Hulver perused Murdick's personnel records and the LST's deck logs, gleaning new information that shows the Indianapolis was likely farther west than the Navy had thought to be at the time of the attack. "This brings us closer to discovering the final resting place of the ship and many of her crew," Hulver said in a Navy statement about the discovery
There have been attempts over the years to find the Indianapolis, and another reportedly is planned for 2017, likely to readjust the search zone because of the finding. Navy officials said there are no current plans for the military to launch a new one. The vessel is believed to be in water more than 3 miles deep and possibly on a side of a steep undersea mountain range, providing a small target for sonar.

What do survivors remember about the horror?

Vic Buckett recalled seeing the Indianapolis "standing straight up" before it slipped below the waves during the first hour of July 30, 1945. He was among former Indianapolis crew members who spoke with National Geographic in 2015.
Many of those who spilled into the water were injured from the torpedo explosions. Survivors thought surely help must be on the way.

Compounding the disaster was the fact that port officials at Leyte were not required to report the arrival -- and ostensibly nonarrival -- of a ship. The Navy did not know of the sinking for a few days, when an anti-sub patrol airplane spotted an oil spill and survivors bobbing in the water.
Edgar Harrell recalled the desperate scene to National Geographic.
"At any given time you could look out and see big fins swimming around and around around. All of a sudden you heard a blood-curdling scream and you look and you see the shark had taken him under.
Day after day went by. Skin began rotting, and Dick Thelen recalled seeing "a lot of guys just crack, or drink the water, or give up, or swim off to an imaginary island."
Hulver said most of the crew were able to get life jackets, but many of the vests became waterlogged or would tend to slide down the body, increasing fatigue. Some sailors grabbed on to floating nets, or the extremely fortunate got into a life raft.
"It was survival mode. Pulling away from the group almost meant certain death. Those who pulled away were picked off by the sharks, or drank saltwater and they floated off."

What's the connection to 'Jaws'?

Robert Shaw, portraying Quint in "Jaws," gave a chilling monologue when Richard Dreyfuss' Hooper asked him about the Indianapolis. Quint said he and the other men who survived the sinking bunched up in the water to ward off marauding sharks.
"And the idea was, the shark goes to the nearest man and then he'd start poundin' and hollerin' and screamin' and sometimes the shark would go away," Quint said. Sometimes he wouldn't go away."
Hulver said Quint's story is largely accurate but may exaggerate the number of those killed by sharks. No one knows for sure. In some instances, the predators targeted the bodies of those who had died from the elements.
"There certainly are sharks," the historian said. "You read more of dehydration, overexposure and the mental collapse. That is the tough part of the story to read."
"Jaws" isn't the only film to cover the story of the USS Indianapolis. There's been talk of a Robert Downey Jr. project. And "USS Indianapolis: Men of Courage" is scheduled to reach the big screen this fall. Nicolas Cage will portray Capt. Charles McVay III.
The production company touts its treatment as "the remarkable true story of survival. Filled with tense action and brave heroes, it is the ultimate untold story of WWII."

How were the sailors rescued?

For days, it seemed as if almost everything worked against the sailors and Marines as they bobbed over a 25-square-mile area in the Pacific. Survivors fired what emergency flares they had. "The flares did not have parachutes, and they did not stay in the air long enough for planes to see them," Hulver said.
The survivors were not spotted until August 2, 1945. By then, only a few hundred were still alive.
A Navy plane on anti-submarine patrol spotted an oil slick and people in the water. A PBY Catalina amphibious plane circled the scene.
"He made the call he needed to land in the water. He was taxiing around and picking up survivors," Hulver said.
Lt. Adrian Marks, who piloted the Catalina, spoke to a reunion group 30 years later and detailed how his crew had to make "heartbreaking decisions."
''I decided that the men in groups stood the best chance of survival,'' Marks said, according to a New York Times 1998 obituary. ''They could look after one another, could splash and scare away the sharks and could lend one another moral support and encouragement.'' They concentrated on individuals. Somehow, the plane hauled 56 sailors away.
Ships were rushed to the scene to save the remaining sailors and Marines.
Capt. Edward Parke, commander of a Marine detachment on board, gave up his life vest on numerous occasions to others and worked to keep his men together and focused on surviving. He died on the second day in the water of exhaustion.
A medical officer constantly reminded others not to drink saltwater. "There is no coming back, they would die in a few hours," Hulver said.'

What happened to the ship's commander?

McVay was rescued about noon August 3, 1945 -- nearly five days after the Indianapolis sank.
A court-martial effectively ended his distinguished career. McVay was acquitted of one charge but was found guilty of endangering the crew by failing to have the Indianapolis zigzag. (The Japanese sub commander testified such a defensive maneuver would not have saved the ship.)
Hulver said he was impressed with McVay's leadership and the fact he did not try to shift blame. "He thought possibly he should have gone down with his ship."
Taking responsibility is a key component of Navy leadership, said Paul Taylor, a spokesman for the Naval History and Heritage Command. "It sometimes can be unforgiving and Capt. McVay knew that."
Many survivors believed the skipper had been made a scapegoat. A joint congressional resolution said his conviction was a "miscarriage of justice." It cited a denied request for an escort ship.
While the conviction has remained on McVay's record, President Bill Clinton in 2000 signed legislation that exonerated the captain "in light of the act that certain exculpatory information was not available to the court-martial board."
McVay did not live to see the exoneration. He took his life in November 1968.

What lessons are to be learned from the tragedy?

Hulver likens the cruiser's World War II service to a bookend: The cruiser was away from Pearl Harbor on training exercises on December 7, 1941, when Japanese planes pulverized the fleet. Over the next few years, it earned 10 battle stars and contributed right up to the end of the war by delivering the atomic bomb parts.
"They had no idea what they were carrying," the historian told CNN. "They were told the faster they deliver it, the shorter the war would be."
Days later, while heading for the Philippines, in what was considered the "backwaters of the war," the Indianapolis' story ended.
The loss of the USS Indianapolis brought major changes to reporting procedures for arrivals and nonarrivals of ships. During World War II, those were not required.
Now there are reporting requirements. The Indianapolis was sailing alone; since then any vessel with 500 or more on board has an escort, possibly a destroyer.
Lifesaving equipment, vests and boats also were improved.
Taylor, the Navy spokesman, said sailors today can be inspired by the struggle for survival and lessons learned. "It is important for them to remember the sacrifices they may need to make."
SubjectAuthorViewsPosted

  SST! I'm watching my DVD about a certain movie about a certain large sea creature!

Ramgator100April 26, 2018 07:49AM

  Life's simple pleasures...

sstrams56April 26, 2018 08:59AM

  If CGI went away TOTALLY, I'd be thrilled.

Ramgator55April 26, 2018 09:21AM

  Oh I don't know............

IowaRam65April 26, 2018 09:29AM

  LOL !!!

RAMbler58April 26, 2018 01:15PM

  Except that...

sstrams62April 26, 2018 01:20PM

  Do you know

zn66April 29, 2018 07:18PM

  I'd like to field that question...

sstrams78April 30, 2018 03:12AM

  Re: I'd like to field that question...

zn58April 30, 2018 09:07AM

  Yeah, that's what I've read..

sstrams56April 30, 2018 09:34AM

  Wasn't it all classified at the time

IowaRam55April 30, 2018 09:48AM

  That I dunno..

sstrams54April 30, 2018 10:48AM

  summ facks

zn56May 06, 2018 04:23AM

  Re: summ facks

IowaRam51May 06, 2018 04:55AM

  Thanks zn..

sstrams52May 06, 2018 10:59AM

  Re: Thanks zn..

zn54May 06, 2018 06:19PM

  Yeah, Shaw..

sstrams53May 07, 2018 07:39AM

  one of the best parts of the movie

ferragamo7961April 30, 2018 10:26AM

  SST music part of the movie

ferragamo7957April 30, 2018 10:28AM

  You're probably thinking..

sstrams63April 30, 2018 10:53AM

  PFFFFT!!! SST acts like....

Ramgator54May 03, 2018 10:44AM

  I do get cocky..

sstrams50May 03, 2018 12:03PM

  Watched it ?

IowaRam51May 03, 2018 02:13PM

  I was Hooper...

sstrams50May 03, 2018 03:53PM

  You mean.....You went in cage? Gage goes in the water??

Ramgator49May 05, 2018 12:02PM

  Yup.. and it was farewell and adieu to..

sstrams50May 05, 2018 12:58PM

  "Jaws"..Though about a shark..

Ramgator59May 03, 2018 10:45AM

  Yeah, that chemistry..

sstrams53May 03, 2018 12:05PM

  EXACTLY why movies are CRAP these days!

Ramgator49May 03, 2018 12:29PM

  The scene that always makes me chuckle.

Ramgator62May 03, 2018 10:47AM

  my little personal relation to the film

zn60May 06, 2018 04:55AM

  Cool! She probably had no idea..

sstrams51May 06, 2018 10:59AM

  Hey SST

IowaRam45May 14, 2018 04:30PM

  Oh yeah, I sure do, Iowa..

sstrams34May 15, 2018 03:01AM

  Strangely enough, "Jaws" did not scare me from the ocean.

Ramgator34May 15, 2018 04:39AM

  A "OH S***!!!!" but VERY cool event at the beach for me about 25 years ago.

Ramgator36May 15, 2018 04:44AM

  I heard that..

sstrams33May 15, 2018 05:44AM

  I was 9 and wanted to see it

ferragamo7933May 15, 2018 08:17AM

  I remember everything but.............

IowaRam36May 15, 2018 08:48AM

  Ah, the Estuary Victim.............

sstrams31May 15, 2018 10:45AM

  Oh yeah.. the cool thing about the Estuary Victim..

sstrams34May 15, 2018 10:53AM